Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Postby Richard Oldfield » Wed Dec 07, 2016 2:16 pm

Hi,

It is time to start being a bit more disciplined in my stock-building activities if Mostyn is ever to going have a full cross-section of the rail traffic that passed by in 1977.

2016 was a good year for the layout in that we built more stock than ever before and also ticked off one of the big missing items - the ex-ironstone hoppers which carried both sulphur and sand in our time period and location.

The big items that are missing still are Associated Octel chemical tanks, LPG tankers (for Anglesey Aluminium) and Petroleum Coke hoppers (also for Anglesey Aluminium).

In addition to other modelling projects I have decided to pick off at least one of these signature freight flows in each of the coming three years. First up will be the Petroleum Coke hoppers which ran in a block train from Immingham to Holyhead.

They do not exist in r-t-r or kit form so we will be starting from scratch.

I am starting this topic to share the project and also invite others to take part if they wish.

Cheers,

Richard
Richard Oldfield
 
Posts: 1202
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:08 pm
Location: Bidston near Birkenhead

Re: Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Postby Richard Oldfield » Fri Dec 16, 2016 2:59 pm

Hi,

A quick introduction to the wagon courtesy of some shots of vehicle 12105:-

Image

Image.

Image

Those with keen eyesight will notice this batch of 17 wagons is not without detail variations. 12105, for example, has 'wings' between the angled end slope of the hopper and the solebar whereas its neighbour does not have this fitting.

More to come.

Cheers,

Richard
Richard Oldfield
 
Posts: 1202
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:08 pm
Location: Bidston near Birkenhead

Re: Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Postby Richard Oldfield » Fri Dec 23, 2016 1:04 pm

Hi,

This is one of those projects which I have dipped into occasionally over the years and then been distracted by something more important or more immediately satisfying.

I have spent a lot of time (and some rusty trigonometry) calculating out the complex shape of the hopper - especially as it meets the solebar and then forms the discharge chutes. This has been drawn out by David Faulkner and we have then been able to successfully fold this up into a 3D paper hopper prototype. Then we stopped................ and scores of other vehicles intervened. We are not too sure about what material to make the hopper out of.

Image

Image

Image

We have not done any work on the underframe but think an etched brass construction would be best - also including all the fine fitments which go on the body. The running gear needs to be sprung (for us) because of the wheelbase.

I have studied the photographs extensively and have a file of the main differences I have noted.

Cheers,

Richard
Richard Oldfield
 
Posts: 1202
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:08 pm
Location: Bidston near Birkenhead

Re: Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Postby Richard Oldfield » Thu Dec 29, 2016 4:50 pm

Hi,

Here are some detail variations for the rivet-counters amongst us, starting off with the most obvious:-

1. As already mentioned the 17 vehicle build can be usefully split into wagons with and without body strengthening.

Vehicles without body strengthening are 12102, 12103, 12106, 12111, 12112 and 12115

Here is a shot of 12111 viewed from the distributor side (eagle-eyed observers will note that the top right loading hatch has been left open)

Image


Vehicles with body strengthening are 12100, 12101, 12104, 12105, 12107, 12108, 12109, 12110, 12113, 12114 and 12116

Here is a shot of 12107 viewed from the side with the self-adjusting brake mechanism (SAB). You can see that there are additional 'wings' at each end of the hopper between the angled hopper end and the solebar. Note that the inverted triangular tunnel at the centre of the wagon has also been partially filled in with an angled 'fillet'.

Image


2. You may also notice a 'step' welded on to the upper hopper body just above the walkways. You can see in the above photos that this is at the right hand end in between the 3rd and 4th top loading hatches. It is the same on the other side of the vehicle - so there are two steps, each at the right hand end of the vehicle when you look at it. This pattern of steps applies to 12100-12107, 12110-12111 and 12115-12116.

It is different for 12108-12109, 12112-12114. These vehicles have the 'steps' at the left hand end of the vehicle on both sides. Here is a shot of 12112 to illustrate this.

Image

More rivet-counting to come.........

[all images were taken during a visit to Anglesey Aluminium in 2002]

Cheers,

Richard
Richard Oldfield
 
Posts: 1202
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:08 pm
Location: Bidston near Birkenhead

Re: Petroleum Coke Hoppers

Postby Richard Oldfield » Fri Jan 13, 2017 3:19 pm

Hi,

The presence of 'wings' [ = body strengthening ] on 11 of the 17 Pet Coke hoppers has more implications for the detail-minded modeller than just to make and fit the 'wings' and central angled 'fillets'.

The arrangement of the self-adjusting brake (SAB) mechanism changes according to whether the vehicle had 'wings':-

Image

Without wings (as above on 12106), the brake cylinder and connecting actuation looks tidy and well-laid out. Note that there is plenty of room for someone to climb up on the end without going near the moving parts.

With wings (as below on 12109) you can see the brake cylinder is now hard up against the diagonal support strut, the whole mechanism appears to have been 'stretched' outwards towards the headstock and there is much less room to safely climb up on the end.

Image

All good rivet-counting stuff :) :)

Cheers,

Richard
Richard Oldfield
 
Posts: 1202
Joined: Mon Mar 01, 2010 8:08 pm
Location: Bidston near Birkenhead


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